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History Of The Early Gardens

In the beginning there was a garden with natural water fountains. Creation's garden. And life was good. All plants were natives. Food was pure and abundant. Predators and prey were in balance (which is not to say they were equal).

Then people got involved and introduced concrete fountains and many other things. They brought with them their urge for order and control, and a robust curiosity fed by experimentation. Soon, the earth was plowed into furrows and crops planted in rows. The best specimens were selected for breeding. Yet even after farmers began growing food for whole communities, and pharmacists took responsibility for mass-producing medicine, people continued to tend gardens.

For sustenance, yes, but also to create beauty, retain a connection to nature, and enjoy the simple pleasure of digging in dirt. Cast stone fountains were a way to carry water to the gardens. For a clearer picture of what a cast stone fountain looks like visit http://www.garden-fountains.com/Detail.bok?no=61. For nearly. well.forever, gardeners and farmers grew plants using common sense, careful observation, and the resources nature provided. Today, we call that approach "organic.

" But that term became necessary only to distinguish those time-tested tactics from the shortsighted chemical practices foisted on the public in the name of progress within the last century. The garden was, and always will be, our connection to the earth. The garden may be the true water fountain of youth. 7,000 B. Barley, millet, and lentils are cultivated in Thessaly, one of the Greek isles. 5,000 B. The staples of Native American cuisine, corn (maize) and common beans, are cultivated in the Western Hemisphere. 4,0000 B.

Hello, variety: The people of the Indus Valley (what is now Pakistan and Afghanistan) are raising wheat, barley, peas, sesame seeds, mangoes, and dates on irrigated fields, as well as bananas, citrus, and grapes for wine in smaller plots. 3,000 B. Potatoes are cultivated and harvested in the Andes Mountains. 2,700 B. The Egyptians already know and grow 500 medicinal plants. 2,700 B. Olive trees are raised in Crete. 2,000 B. Watermelon is cultivated in Africa; figs are cultivated in Arabia; tea and bananas, in India; and apples, in the Indus Valley. 1,900 B. The Egyptian pharaoh Ramses III commissions more than 500 public gardens. 600 B.


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